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iOS Programming Recipe 26: Using Collection Operators

Assumptions

  • You have strong knowledge of Objective-C and Core Foundation.
  • You have basic understanding of of KVC (Key Value Coding) within the Objective-C language

Many if not all developers use collection objects everyday while developing great apps, but few know about the power of collection operators. As part of KVC (key value coding), collection operators help make many routine tasks simple by eliminating and simplifying code.

Those of you still waiting on the blocks part II article, hang in there, I’ll get to it soon enough. For now I thought I would give ya’ll something short and sweet that is also really useful.

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iOS Programming Recipe 24: Creating a Mask for Clipping Drawings

This Recipe is inspired by a recent problem I ran into and had quite a bit of trouble with it. Basically I wanted to create a shape and fill it with a gradient. Sounds pretty easy huh? well, not quite as we’ll find out shortly. While my particular application required filling a circle with an ellipse, we can create any shape. In essence we’re creating a window (shaped however we want) where the user can see only a portion of the drawing behind it.

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5 Time Saving Tips In Xcode

Working with Xcode can sometimes be a frustrating experience…

However, Xcode has a few times saving features that really make a difference in day to day development. In this post we are going to break from the traditional format in order to examine a few of these features.

1. Snippets

Xcode snippets have gotten a bad wrap since they were introduced. This is mostly because they seem to lack some obvious features and are poorly documented. However, this doesn’t stop them from being an immensely powerful addition to Xcode. So let’s dive into using existing snippets and creating new ones.

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iOS Programming Recipe 23: Audio Recording and Playback

One of the coolest things about the iPhone is it’s ability to handle audio. Since it was born out of an iPod, the iPhone handles audio quite well. In this recipe we’ll explore audio recording and playback. We’ll be creating a simple app that records a sound file and plays it back. We’re basically making a voice memo app that only saves one memo and plays it back.

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iOS Programming Recipe 21: Photo Filtering Using Core Image

This week I thought I would have a bit of fun and explore image manipulation using Core Image. This sounds like it could be pretty tough, but Apple has actually made this very easy. In this Recipe we’ll be creating a photo filter app that will let you choose a photo or take a photo using the camera and filter it.

Assumptions

  • You know the basics of Xcode, If not, we got you covered: Familiarizing Yourself With Xcode
  • You know how to create outlets and actions using the interace builder
  • You have a developer account and can run this app on hardware, This will be necessary if you want to capture an image using the camera

Setting Up the Project

Setting Up the Framework

Go ahead and start with a single view controller application using storyboards and title it “ImageFilterApp”.

For this App we’ll need to use the Core Image framework. To add a framework select the top level project from the project navigator on the left and scroll down in the main window to “Linked Frameworks and Libraries”. Here you can press the “+” button to add the new framework. When the dialogue opens choose the “CoreImage.framework” and press the “Add” button.

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iOS Programming Recipe 19: Using Core Motion to Access Gyro and Accelerometer

One of the coolest things smartphones are capable of now is the ability to sense motion and orientation. The iPhone does this with the use of a 3-axis Accelerometers and Gyroscopes. In this tutorial we’re going to create an app that indicates the current G and speed of rotation. Not exactly a pretty app but still instructional.

Assumptions

  • You have a developer account and have provisioned a device. Unfortunately we can’t simulate this stuff without hardware. Follow the Apple documentation here to get set up.
  • Make Sure you head over our Github page and download the source code. NSCookbook Github Recipe 19
  • You have looked over some of the past tutorials and are comfortable with creating outlets and actions from the interface builder

Setting Up the Interface

Our Interface will be pretty simple as we will be displaying 12 values. We’ll show Max and Current Acceleration and Rotation about the X,Y and Z axis’.

Start with a new single view project titled “GyrosAndAccelerometers” and make sure the storyboards are selected.

Once the new project is created, open up the storyboard and drag 25 Labels onto the view. Twelve of these labels will be our outlets that will display the output data for each axis. Rename the labels and add a button as shown in the image below:

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iOS Programming Recipe 18: Unit Testing With GHUnit & CocoaPods

This Recipe will cover using GHUnit to unit test the Weather Application we developed in Recipe 15: Building A Weather Application. GHUnit is an open source unit testing framework for Mac and iOS that (in my opinion) has capabilities superior to the unit testing capabilities built into Xcode. Many developers have there own philosophy on unit testing and this Recipe will not attempt to define another. We will not be defining unit testing best practices or even go into detail about writing particular tests. This Recipe is purely about getting started with GHUnit and how it can be used in the context of a real application. Oh and did I mention? GHUnit makes writing asynchronous unit tests a breeze!

Assumptions

  • This recipe uses the Weather Application created in Recipe 15: Building A Weather Application, it is highly recommended that you work through or at least familiarize yourself with that recipe before continuing on to this one.
  • Source code for the weather app can be downloaded via GitHub. The revision of the Weather App after Recipe 15 has been tagged recipe-15, make sure to start there.
  • This recipe also relies heavily on CocoaPods, it is recommended you watch NSScreencast’s video tutorial if you are not familiar with CocoaPods.

Getting Started

Download The Starting Application
  • First download the source code for our starting application, which happens to be the Weather App developed in Recipe 15.
  • Refer to Recipe 15 for details on setting up a Weather Underground developer account in order to obtain a personal API key. You will need this key in order to access Weather Underground’s services.
  • The Weather App was built using CocoaPods, so after getting the source code you will need to navigate to the project root directory (where the .xcodeproj file lives) and run the following command in terminal. Note this will not work if you have not yet installed CocoaPods, learn about doing so here.

1
$ pod install
  • This will add all of the necessary external dependencies the Weather App needs. It will also create an .xcworkspace file which you will need to open when accessing this project (not the .xcodeproj file).
  • Add your person API key for Weather Underground to WeatherAPIKey.h, then build & run the application. If everything has been done right you should now have a functioning weather application!

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iOS Programming Recipe 14: Implementing A UICollectionViewController

UICollectionView is great for displaying information in a grid or other custom layouts. In iOS 6 you’ll see collection views most likely used in many apps such as the podcasts app for viewing different podcasts. Since in most cases you’ll want to use UICollectionViewController, we’ll focus on that for this recipe.

Assumptions

  • You are familiar with Xcode and setting up a single view controller. If not check out our recipe on Xcode first.

Setting Up The View

Go ahead and create a new single view controller project. I titled mine “CollectioViewFun”. When the project opens up, You’ll want to delete the single view controller from the storyboard and drag a new collection view controller in it’s place. This should look like the following:

CollectionViewController

Now since our class type has changed from a standard view controller to a collection view controller we’ll want to change the class type in the viewController.h file as well. Go ahead and change the class name from ViewController to CollectionViewController as well. Don’t forget to change all instances of the term “ViewController” in both the .m and .h files:

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iOS Programming Recipe 13: Using Property Lists (Plists)

In Recipe 11 we created a UITableview which relied on 4 arrays to supply the data sources with data. Since we didn’t have much data, this wasn’t an issue, but what if we wanted 40 different animals? Then our arrays would be very long. One way we can organize this data a little better is through the use of a Property Lists (Plist). Plist can be handy for storing Arrays, Dictionaries, and Strings.

Assumptions

  • You have looked over Part 1 and 2 of the UITableview recipes. I’ll be modifing the Tableview example a bit to remove these arrays and include them into a plist so you may want to go read those.

First, A Word on Property Lists

Plists are basically just text files intended to be more of a readable source of static values. In general, Don’t use them if:

  1. Your data is large. The entire Plist gets loaded into memory and is therefore large data doesn’t play well with them.
  2. You need relationships. Actions such as joins and searches don’t work at all in plist.
  3. You need to update often, edit data, remove items. These are all operations that are better suited for a Core Data or SQL.
  4. Your data does not consist primarily of strings and numbers.

So there you have it in a nutshell! Feel free to check out the documentation on the Mac Developer Library here

Creating The Property List

Alright, while there are a few formats of Plist (XML,binary,ASCII), XML is the most prevailent so we’ll be proceeding with this recipe using XML. Where we left off in the UITableview tutorial, the viewDidLoad method had four defined arrays. We’ll be removing these arrays and putting that data into a Plist instead. The viewDidLoad method looked like this when we left off:

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iOS Programming Recipe 11: Using The UITableView Part I

In most apps you’re sure to find a table view whenever a list of items needs to be presented. UITableView, similar to UIPickerView, declares both a data source and delegate protocol. The data source protocol is required while the delegate is optional. We’ll need to make use of the data source protocol for the UITableView class. For this recipe I chose to show a table view with bugs and animals shown. The bugs and animals will have seperate sections.

Assumptions

  • You are familiar with Xcode, if not familiarize yourself here.

Setting Up the View

First start with a single view controller project. Now drag a UITableView object onto the existing view from the object library and then drag a UITableViewCell onto the newly created table view. When you’re done you should have something that looks like this:

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