iOS Programming Recipe 10: Adding A Shadow To UIView

Assumptions

Shadows!

Even the slightest drop shadow here and there can dramatically improve the look of your application’s UI, but at what cost?

Today we will cover adding shadows to UIViews of all kinds. Feel free to check out the source code for this recipe available on our GitHub page.

[Read more…]

iOS Programming Recipe 8: Using UIAppearance For A Custom Look

Everyone wants to make their app look unique! Well the UIAppearance protocol can help you! In iOS 5.0 Apple introduced the UIAppearance proxy API which allows you the developer to customize many of the appearance aspects of UIKit elements. I know what you’re thinking… Can’t I already do that? Well sure, but not on the same scale as UIAppearance will allow, and furthermore, changing the appearance of UI components on a per object basis gets really old, really fast.

So let’s dive into an example right quick…

Say you have an app with a UINavigationBar and you want something other than the default background color (tint color). You would probably try something similar to the following


[self.navigationBar setTintColor:myColor];

Then you decide another part of your app needs a navigation bar and you end up writing the same code to change the background color for that one as well. This continues as time goes on and before long you end up with an unmanageable mess, leaving you sad and depressed wishing there was a better way… enter UIAppearance…

[Read more…]

iOS Programming Recipe 7: Using the UIPickerView

The UIPickerView can be a frustrating element for a new iOS programmer. I know first hand as I was just recently there.

For this example I’m going to create a simple color picker. from the picker we can select a color and the RGB value will print to the screen. Seems easy enough? right? Let’s get to it!

Assumptions

  • You Are familiar with Xcode and the storyboard
  • you know how to create a single view controller

Setting up the Storyboard

First start out with a single view controller and title it whatever you like. I titled mine “PickIt”.

From the Storyboard drag a new UIPickerView object on to the view from the Object Library in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

Create some new labels titled “Color Picker”, “You Chose:”, and “Nothing”. Arrange all of these elements as seen on the scren below. Optionally you can choose a background for your view too.

[Read more…]

iOS Programming Recipe 6: Creating a custom UIView using a Nib

Creating a custom UIView using a Nib

Assumptions
  1. You are familiar with creating UIView subclasses, and instantiating UIView’s both from a Nib file or in code
  2. You are familiar with Nib files
Background

Sometimes you find yourself trying to create a quick composite UIView (UIView subclass w/ multiple subviews) where a UIViewController doesn’t seem necessary Please note that a UIViewController is the right choice most of the time. This can be a real pain to setup entirely in code if you have many subviews, and god forbid if you want to use auto layout! So you may find yourself wanting to use a nib to simplify things a bit, well this tutorial will go through the process of doing just that.

Getting Started
  • Create a new Xcode project based on the single view application template for iOS. This tutorial will assume you are using ARC, so you may want to make that selection when creating the new project.
  • Once you have created the new project a new UIView subclass to the project and name it CustomView.
  • Then create a new Nib file named CustomView.nib and add it to the project.
[Read more…]

iOS Programming Recipe 5: Passing Values Between Segues with PrepareForSegue

In Part 1 and 2 of Recipe 3 I stepped through creating a modal relationship using storyboards. There was no code needed to make this relationship using storyboards. If you want to pass information from the presenting view to the presented view you’ll need to add some code.

Assumptions

  • You know how to set up a segue relationship using the storyboard. If not go read part 1 and 2 of Recipe 3 here: Part 1Part 2

Setting Up the Views

To start off, I created a new single view controller project and replaced the view controller with a navigation view controller. Then I deleted the root controller and added two new view controllers. I made one view controller the root view controller, and I didn’t setup the segue on the other controller for now. Then I gave each views the titles “Root View Controller” and “First View Controller” respectively. See recipe 3 for more details on setting this up.

Next I deleted the viewController class and all of it’s refferences. Delete the viewController.m file and viewController.h file and Xcode will ask you if you would like to remove the refferences.

Next we’ll need to create two new UIViewController Classes. To do this push the plus sign in the bottom left hand corner of the project navigator.

Create New UIViewController Classes

When prompted choose objective-C class under Cocoa Touch and press next. For the next prompt name the Class “RootViewController” and choose the subclass “UIViewController” then press next. You will then press create on the next prompt. Repeat this step and name the next class “FirstViewController”.

Choosing UIViewController subclass

When you’re done creating classes you should see the newly created .m and .h files in the project navigator.

New Project Navigator

 

The last thing we’ll want to do is connect our new classes to our views on the storyboard. To do this, select the view and in the utilities pane under the identity inspector choose the class from the dropdown.  Do this for both the RootViewController and the FirstViewController.

[Read more…]

iOS Programming Recipe 4: Using NSURLConnection

URL Requests

Making URLS requests on the Mac is as simple as

  1. open terminal.app
  2. then typing the following

$ curl https://alpha-api.app.net/stream/0/posts/stream/global

This retrieves the APP.NET global stream. If you are not familiar with APP.NET, it is a Twitter like service that sports an open api, similar to how Twitter used to be.

The result of running curl is a large JSON string representing the afore mentioned global stream as shown below

curl result

Unfortunately making URL requests in your iOS application isn’t quite this easy, but fortunately NSURLConnection does most of the heavy lifting for you.

NSURLConnection

The NSURLConnection class reference, located on Apple’s developer website has the following description

An NSURLConnection object provides support to perform the loading of a URL request. The interface for NSURLConnection is sparse, providing only the controls to start and cancel asynchronous loads of a URL request.

Which basically says NSURLConnection is used to perform URL requests, but how do you create the actual requests?

NSURLRequest to the rescue!

[Read more…]

iOS Programming Recipe 1: Controlling Actions With Buttons

This Recipe is going to cover the UIButton and a few ways that we can work with it.

Assumptions

Uses

There are a few things we can do with buttons, but the main reason you would want a button is to either enter a value or trigger an action. In some cases, you may want to have the button change it’s properties based on some state in your app.

Adding a UIButton using the interface builder

From the Object library located in the Utility bar on the bottom right find the “Round Rectangular Button” . Click the Button object and drag it onto your view. Whew! that was easy!  Since were already in the interface builder, go ahead and click and drag a label onto the view as well.

Your view should look something like this:

To change the text value of the button go ahead and double click it. Rename the button to “Button 1”

Making the Connections

Now that we’ve designed the interface(although it’s kind of ugly), it’s time to make the connections. Change your view to the assitant editor view and control click and drag the button into the .h file between @interface and @end.

[Read more…]

css.php
Privacy Policy